What’s Killing Farmed Salmon? New Virus May Also Pose Risk to Wild Salmon

ScienceDaily (July 12, 2010) — Farmed fish are an increasingly important food source, with a global harvest now at 110 million tons and growing at more than 8 percent a year. But epidemics of infectious disease threaten this vital industry, including one of its most popular products: farmed Atlantic salmon. Perhaps even more worrisome: these infections can spread to wild fish coming in close proximity to marine pens and fish escaping from them.

Arizona’s Smoking Ban Reduced Hospital Visits

ScienceDaily (May 23, 2010) — Two University of Arizona researchers have studied the relationship between Arizona's 2007 law that bans smoking in public places and hospitalization rates for a range of ailments related to secondhand smoke exposure. Their results: Admissions for acute myocardial infarction or AMI, stroke, asthma and angina decreased following the implementation of the ban.

Long-Lasting Sensory Loss in World Trade Center Workers from Airborne Toxins After 9/11 Attacks

New research from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions reports that workers exposed to the complex mixture of toxic airborne chemicals following the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City had a decreased ability to detect odors and irritants two years after the exposure.

Currents Influence Fish Stocks: More Cod in the Barents Sea

The entire North Atlantic warmed up during the 1920s and 1930s. More fish appeared not only in the Barents Sea but also off Iceland and Greenland. This warm period reached its peak at the end of the thirties and lasted until roughly 1960, when the waters began turning colder again -- and fisheries resources declined once more. In recent years, the North Atlantic has shown signs of a new period of warming.