EV Tax incentives can’t last forever

At this moment in time there seems to be no stopping the electric vehicle industry which is going from strength to strength. Sales are increasing, more automobile manufacturers are joining the party and motorists seem more at ease with electric vehicles there than they ever have been. While one of the reasons the industry has been kick started over the last couple of years is tax incentives and financial incentives some governments around the world, would you still buy an electric vehicle with no tax incentives today? The likelihood is that the vast majority of EV enthusiast would not buy an electric vehicle today without the tax incentives and financial attractions offered by governments around the world. This is an industry which is still very much in its infancy, the technology is still developing and perhaps many people are still yet to fully appreciate the impact which petrol/gasoline vehicles have upon the environment.

New Advancements in Fog-Harvesting

Fog-harvesting, an idea that has been around for several years and already in existence in 17 countries, is a technique that captures potable water from fog. Researchers at MIT, working in collaboration with scientists in Chile, have found a way to improve this technology, making potable water more easily attainable in arid countries.

Seabirds are Indicator Species for Climate Change

It has been said that seabirds are key indicators of the impact of climate change on the world’s oceans. How exactly? In Antarctica, for example, seabirds depend on ice: Seabirds eat fish, which eat krill. The krill eat algae, and the algae grow underneath sea ice. With warming oceans, and less ice, there will major consequences for this food chain. In an effort to quantify and model how seabirds will fare in the face of climate change, Stephanie Jenouvrier, a biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), investigates the topic.

Climate change mitigation essential for even the most common species

Anna Taylor takes a closer look at the worrying findings of a recently published study which, unusually, chose to assess potential climate change mitigation scenarios on the more widespread and common species found on our planet...

Salt consumption is regulated by the body

Many people are trying to reduce their salt consumption in an effort to reduce elevated blood pressure, or because they think that too much salt consumption is bad in some way for them. A new study shows that the body is pretty good at regulating its salt intake, and efforts to reduce the level of salt in foods (think restaurant foods which often are heavily salted) will not work since the body will seek extra salt elsewhere. The study documents in humans what neuroscientists have reported for some time: animals' sodium (salt) intake is controlled by networks in the brain and not by the salt in one’s food. The findings have important implications for future U.S. nutrition policy directed at sodium intake. Findings from the new study, entitled "Normal Range of Human Dietary Sodium Intake: A Perspective Based on 24-hour Urinary Sodium Excretion Worldwide," is published online in advance of the print edition of the American Journal of Hypertension.

Hidden Mega-Canyon Discovered in Greenland

With Google’s street-view technology, one would think the entire Earth has been mapped. However, scientists from Bristol’s School of Geographical Sciences have recently discovered a mega-canyon hidden deep beneath Greenland’s ice sheet.

Stink Bug Populations Could Harm Late-Season Harvests

Halyomorpha halys, better known as the stink bug, was accidentally introduced into the United States in 1998. Being known as an invasive species in recent years, this bug has infested homes from the East Coast to the Midwest, causing significant damage as an agricultural pest. Surveys in Oregon have also reported the presence of the stink bug and researchers at Oregon State University warn of an increased risk of damage to late-ripening crops this year after discovering record levels of the pest.

Why eating insects is good for the environment

As a growing number of chefs put bugs on the menu, Ben Whitford samples his first 'entomophagic' meal and talks to the edible-insect entrepreneurs hoping to convert the rest of us to the environmental and nutritional benefits of eating insects.... The other day, at a busy restaurant in the middle of Washington, D.C, I had bugs for lunch. Sitting at a polished table in Oyamel - a high-end Mexican eatery a stone's throw from the Capitol - I was presented with the house specialty: a fresh corn tortilla cradling a fist-sized heap of glistening chapulines, the roasted grasshoppers prized as a delicacy in the Oaxaca region of Mexico. Reader, I ate them. The carapaces were disconcertingly crunchy, but the taste was subtle - mostly chipotle chilli and lime, with a pleasant nuttiness from the grasshoppers themselves. Later, after picking the legs from my teeth, I chatted with Oyamel head chef Colin King, who sells two or three dozen tacos de chapulines a day to curious diners. Many guests first try them on a dare, King said, only to order second and third helpings. "People generally end up liking the flavour," he adds. Grasshopper tacos won't replace crab cakes and steaks as D.C. power-lunch staples, but the dish's popularity points to the gradual mainstreaming of entomophagy, the practice of eating bugs.

Hydrogen Fuel May Have a Bright Future, According to BMW

Electric vehicles are showing strong progress throughout the world. These vehicles have been winning support from governments and consumers alike, with consumers favoring these vehicles because of the fuel savings they represent. Many of the world's most prominent automakers that are interested in clean transpiration have devoted their efforts to developing conventional battery-electric vehicles. Germany automaker BMW is one such company. BMW has become a vocal advocate of clean transpiration and has recently launched its new electric vehicle, called the BMW i3. The automaker's interest is not restricted to battery-electrics, however, as BMW sees a promising future in hydrogen fuel.

Deadly effects of air pollution detailed in MIT study

We know that pollution is bad for us, don't we? And we guess that living in areas with high levels of pollution is probably not good for our health, but we need to live near our job, and populated areas offer more employment opportunity, recreational and cultural opportunities and other advantages. But at what cost? And what can we do to reduce the levels of pollution without significantly changing the life styles we have all become accustomed to? Before we consider draconian changes, we would like to know just how bad it is. Researchers from MIT's Laboratory for Aviation and the Environment have come out with some sobering new data on air pollution's impact on Americans' health. The group tracked ground-level emissions from sources such as industrial smokestacks, vehicle tailpipes, marine and rail operations, and commercial and residential heating throughout the United States, and found that such air pollution causes about 200,000 early deaths each year. Emissions from road transportation are the most significant contributor, causing 53,000 premature deaths, followed closely by power generation, with 52,000.