Gaining Weight and Having Type 2 Diabetes

Have you ever wondered how can you possibly gain so much weight when somebody else eats even more and gains less? Obviously, some of the answer is how much exercise one does. Another part of the answer is shown in the first study of its type by Australian researchers. Healthy people with a genetic predisposition to Type 2 diabetes gain more weight overeating over the short term than their non-genetically prone counterparts.

Cape Wind Has Found a Buyer for Its Clean Power

Cape Wind, the first offshore wind farm in the US to win regulatory approval, has found a buyer for half of the electricity it will generate, when completed. Investor-owned energy company National Grid announced a power purchase agreement with Cape Wind Associates, the project's developers, on Friday.

Surprising Skin Cancer Risk: Too Much Driving

Long hours behind the wheel may increase the risk of skin cancer, according to a surprising new study. Facial skin cancers were found to occur more often on the left-side — the side that's next to the window while driving — among a group of about 1,050 patients in Saint Louis. The findings were most significant for men. While the results show only an association (not a cause-effect link) and would need to be replicated in a larger population to be viewed as firm, they call attention to what might be overlooked by otherwise sun-conscious citizens — exposure to UV rays through the car window.

NOAA Expands Commercial and Recreational Fishing Closure in Gulf of Mexico

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) continues to monitor water conditions in the part of the Gulf of Mexico that is being impacted by the huge oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon sinking. NOAA has recently modified and expanded the boundaries of the closed fishing area to better reflect the current location of the BP oil spill, and is extending the fishing restriction until May 17. The closed area now represents slightly less than 4.5 percent of Gulf of Mexico federal waters. The original closure boundaries, which took effect last Sunday, encompassed less than three percent. This leaves many areas that are still available for fishing. The vast majority of Gulf waters has not been affected by the oil spill and continues to support productive fisheries and tourism activities.

No end in sight to spill as BP costs mount

BP Plc said on Monday it had incurred $350 million in costs so far from the huge oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico as fears mounted of a prolonged and growing environmental and economic disaster. BP was considering its next move to contain the spill after its most promising short-term remedy struck a snag over the weekend. Its shares fell about 1 percent in early trade in London against a 2.5 percent rise in the European oil sector index. BP's value has been savaged by investors since the crisis erupted last month. The uncontrolled spill, which could become the worst in U.S. history, is expected to drift farther west, away from Florida's popular beaches but into the important shipping channels and rich seafood areas off the central Louisiana coast, west of the Mississippi Delta.

BP seeks solution after dome problem occurs

BP Plc engineers will search for a solution on Sunday after suffering a setback in an attempt to contain oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico with a huge metal dome, dashing hopes for a quick, temporary solution to a growing environmental disaster. The company was forced to move the four-story containment dome off to the side on the sea floor after a buildup of crystallized gas forced it to suspend the effort. Covering the leak with the structure was seen as the best short-term way to stem the flow from a ruptured oil well. BP expects to take up to two days plotting its next move, Chief Operating Officer Doug Suttles said.

Containment dome suspended just above U.S. Gulf leak

BP Plc engineers using undersea robots had a massive metal chamber hovering just above a gushing, ruptured oil well in the Gulf of Mexico on Saturday in a mission seen as the best chance yet to contain what could be the most damaging U.S. oil spill. The 98-ton structure has been lowered to the seabed almost 1 mile below the surface. The mission requires pinpoint accuracy in the dark and under high water pressure. The container was suspended just over the leak while crews using remotely operated vehicles prepared the seabed, said the Unified Command Center, which is coordinating spill-fighting efforts. "It will hover there until they are ready. They hope to lower to sea floor today, but they need to finish prepping the surface," the center said in an update late on Friday.

The Neanderthal in You

Whatever happened to Neanderthal man and woman? Where did they go? After extracting ancient DNA from the 40,000 year old bones of Neanderthals, scientists have obtained a draft sequence of the Neanderthal genome, yielding important new insights into the evolution of modern humans. Among the findings, published in the May 7 issue of Science, is evidence that shortly after early modern humans migrated out of Africa, some of them interbred with Neanderthals, leaving bits of Neanderthal DNA sequences scattered through the genomes of present day non-Africans.

Surprising New Diet Tip: Lose Weight Quickly

The key to long-term weight loss and maintenance might be to lose weight quickly rather than gradually, at least in the initial stages of dieting, a new study suggests. More research is needed to determine the best approach, however.

Gulf residents ready “hairmats” to soak up oil

(Reuters) - While a vast containment operation dumps gallons of chemical dispersant and lays miles of plastic boom to attack a massive spreading oil slick, some U.S. Gulf Coast residents are turning to more unlikely remedies -- hair and pantyhose. Shoreline communities threatened by the oil spewing from a ruptured Gulf of Mexico undersea well have started a grassroots campaign to fabricate homemade booms from these mundane materials to help sponge up the tarry mess before it sloshes ashore.